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<B>CONVERSION OF ADULTS</B>

 

Converting to Judaism is a serious, extremely personal decision that requires a great deal of soul searching, a tremendous commitment to learn about Judaism, and a true desire to live a Jewish life. One should never convert to make someone else happy. Conversion should be done to enrich your own spiritual life. To become a Jew, one cannot simply decide that s/he is Jewish.   S/he must engage in a rigorous study of Judaism while living our rituals, traditions, and customs.

 

A male who wishes to convert must undergo <a href=https://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-custom.cgi?d=ramat-shalom&page=11280 target=dlink><U>Brit Milah</U></a> or <a href=https://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-custom.cgi?d=ramat-shalom&page=11282 target=dlink><U>Hatifat Dam</U></a>. These procedures are performed by a mohel, a Jew who has received extensive training in ritual circumcision. Rabbi Andrew will put you in touch with a mohel you can trust.

 

At the conclusion of a convert's studies, s/he sits before a Beit Din (a court or panel) made up of three Jews (who are not related to the convert), explains why s/he has chosen to convert to Judaism and answers any questions the Beit Din might have. Upon approval of the Beit Din, the convert than must immerse in a mikveh, a ritual pool, while reciting specific blessings. Upon completing the ritual of mikveh, the convert is welcomed into the Jewish people as a "Jew-by-choice" and is to be treated no differently than one who is born into Judaism.

 

<B>CONVERSION OF CHILDREN</B>

 

Oftentimes, parents choose to convert their child to Judaism. Perhaps they adopted a child. Or maybe one or both of the parents choose to convert to Judaism and convert their child along with them. It is also very common for inter-faith couples, where dad is Jewish, but mom is not, to to convert their children. While many in the Reconstructionist and Reform Movements consider a child born to a Jewish father and non-Jewish mother to be Jewish, the Conservative and Orthodox Movements believe that a child born to a non-Jewish mother is not Jewish - even if the father is. While a child born to a non-Jewish mother is considered Jewish within the walls of Ramat Shalom, this child might very well find her identity being questioned by the larger Jewish community as she get older. Because of this, our Rabbi strongly encourages inter-faith families where dad is Jewish, but mom is not, to consider converting their children.

 

In order for a child to convert to Judaism, the parents must agree, before a beit din, to raise her as a Jew. Immersion in a mikveh is required for children. At least one parent is expected to go in the mikveh with the child. For infant boys, either Brit Milah or Hatifat Dam is required. For boys who are no longer infants, Rabbi Andrew will discuss Brit Milah/Hatifat Dam options.  

 

A child (especially a young child or infant) is not required to do any type of studying in preparation for a conversion. Ultimately, of course, the child will study and, in essence, make the decision to accept the decision her parents made to convert her/him. At the child's bat mitzvah/bar mitzvah, when s/he stands before the Torah and chants from it, s/he will actually affirm her/his conversion to Judaism.

 

Rabbi Andrew is honored to have worked with many wonderful "Jews-by choice" - some of whom are now leaders at Ramat Shalom. He is happy to speak with anyone who is considering converting to Judaism. However, he is only committed to working with those with a strong, personal and spiritual conviction to pursuing conversion. If you are interested in conversion, please call the office to set up an preliminary appointment with the Rabbi. Those who the Rabbi chooses to work with will be expected to meet with the Rabbi on a regular basis. The Rabbi will develop an individualized course of study for each conversion student that will involve reading, synagogue attendance, and involvement in Jewish life. At the conclusion of their conversion program, each convert will be expected to write a statement explaining why they have chosen to become a Jew. In addition, on the first Kabbalat Shabbat service after one converts to Judaism, the Ramat Shalom will formally welcome the newest member of the Jewish people by asking her/him to carry the Torah around our sanctuary as each member of the congregation welcomes her/him.

 

For more information on conversion, please click <a href=http://www.myjewishlearning.com/life/Life_Events/Conversion/Conversion_101.shtml?LFLE target=dlink>HERE</a>.

 

For help with choosing a Hebrew name, visit: <a href=http://www.hebrewbabynames.com/ target=dlink>http://www.hebrewbabynames.com/</a>

 

Below, you will find the blessings recited by a convert who immerses in a makveh after a lengthy period of study, (Brit Milah/Hatifat Dam for male), and approval of a Beit Din:

 

<I>Baruch Atah Ado-nai Elo-henu Melech Ha'olam Asher Kidshanu B'mitzvotav V'tzivanu Al Ha'tevillah</I>

 

Blessed are You, O Lord, our God, King of the universe, who has sanctified us with His commandments and commanded us regarding the immersion

 

<I>Baruch Atah Ado-nai Elo-henu Melech Ha'olam , Shehecheyanu, v'ki'manu, v'higiyanu, lazman hazeh</I>

 

Blessed are You, L-rd our G-d, King of the Universe, who has granted us life, sustained us and enabled us to reach this occasion.

 

Blessings over the performance of mitzvot (e.g. lighting candles) always take place before the action of the mitzvah. There is one exception: when one who is converting immerses in the mikveh, he needs to recite the blessings <B>after</B> the immersion, not before. As he is not a Jew until he immerses, he cannot recite a blessing meant to be said by a Jew until he actually is one. The convert becomes a Jew only after the immersion is completed. So he immerses himself once in the water. Then, he says the blessings. After the blessings, he immerses twice more and then leaves the mikveh. He is a Jew!

<B>CONVERSION OF ADULTS</B>

Converting to Judaism is a serious, extremely personal decision that requires a great deal of soul searching, a tremendous commitment to learn about Judaism, and a true desire to live a Jewish life.  One should never convert to make someone else happy.  Conversion should be done to enrich your own spiritual life. To become a Jew, one cannot simply decide that s/he is Jewish.   S/he must engage in a rigorous study of Judaism while living our rituals, traditions, and customs.  

A male who wishes to convert must undergo <a href=https://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-custom.cgi?d=ramat-shalom&page=11280 target=dlink><U>Brit Milah</U></a> or <a href=https://andyswebtools.com/cgi-bin/p/awtp-custom.cgi?d=ramat-shalom&page=11282 target=dlink><U>Hatifat Dam</U></a>.  These procedures are performed by a mohel, a Jew who has received extensive training in ritual circumcision.  Rabbi Andrew will put you in touch with a mohel you can trust. 

At the conclusion of a convert's studies, s/he sits before a Beit Din (a court or panel) made up of three Jews (who are not related to the convert), explains why s/he has chosen to convert to Judaism and answers any questions the Beit Din might have.  Upon approval of the Beit Din, the convert than must immerse in a mikveh, a ritual pool, while reciting specific blessings.  Upon completing the ritual of mikveh, the convert is welcomed into the Jewish people as a "Jew-by-choice" and is to be treated no differently than one who is born into Judaism.

<B>CONVERSION OF CHILDREN</B>

Oftentimes, parents choose to convert their child to Judaism.  Perhaps they adopted a child.  Or maybe one or both of the parents choose to convert to Judaism and convert their child along with them.  It is also very common for inter-faith couples, where dad is Jewish, but mom is not, to to convert their children.  While many in the Reconstructionist and Reform Movements consider a child born to a Jewish father and non-Jewish mother to be Jewish,  the Conservative and Orthodox Movements believe that a child born to a non-Jewish mother is not Jewish - even if the father is.  While a child born to a non-Jewish mother is considered Jewish within the walls of Ramat Shalom, this child might very well find her identity being questioned by the larger Jewish community as she get older.  Because of this, our Rabbi strongly encourages inter-faith families where dad is Jewish, but mom is not, to consider converting their children.

In order for a child to convert to Judaism, the parents must agree, before a beit din, to raise her as a Jew.  Immersion in a mikveh is required for children.  At least one parent is expected to go in the mikveh with the child.  For infant boys, either Brit Milah or Hatifat Dam is required. For boys who are no longer infants, Rabbi Andrew will discuss Brit Milah/Hatifat Dam options.   

A child (especially a young child or infant) is not required to do any type of studying in preparation for a conversion.  Ultimately, of course, the child will study and, in essence, make the decision to accept the decision her parents made to convert her/him.  At the child's bat mitzvah/bar mitzvah, when s/he stands before the Torah and chants from it, s/he will actually affirm her/his conversion to Judaism.

Rabbi Andrew is honored to have worked with many wonderful "Jews-by choice" - some of whom are now leaders at Ramat Shalom.  He is happy to speak with anyone who is considering converting to Judaism.  However, he is only committed to working with those with a strong, personal and spiritual conviction to pursuing conversion.  If you are interested in conversion, please call the office to set up an preliminary appointment with the Rabbi.  Those who the Rabbi chooses to work with will be expected to meet with the Rabbi on a regular basis.  The Rabbi will develop an individualized course of study for each conversion student that will involve reading, synagogue attendance, and involvement in Jewish life.  At the conclusion of their conversion program, each convert will be expected to write a statement explaining why they have chosen to become a Jew.  In addition, on the first Kabbalat Shabbat service after one converts to Judaism, the Ramat Shalom will formally welcome the newest member of the Jewish people by asking her/him to carry the Torah around our sanctuary as each member of the congregation welcomes her/him.  

For more information on conversion, please click <a href=http://www.myjewishlearning.com/life/Life_Events/Conversion/Conversion_101.shtml?LFLE target=dlink>HERE</a>.  

For help with choosing a Hebrew name, visit: <a href=http://www.hebrewbabynames.com/ target=dlink>http://www.hebrewbabynames.com/</a>

Below, you will find the blessings recited by a convert who immerses in a makveh after a lengthy period of study, (Brit Milah/Hatifat Dam for male), and approval of a Beit Din:

<I>Baruch Atah Ado-nai Elo-henu Melech Ha'olam Asher Kidshanu B'mitzvotav V'tzivanu Al Ha'tevillah</I>

Blessed are You, O Lord, our God, King of the universe, who has sanctified us with His commandments and commanded us regarding the immersion

<I>Baruch Atah Ado-nai Elo-henu Melech Ha'olam , Shehecheyanu, v'ki'manu, v'higiyanu, lazman hazeh</I>

Blessed are You, L-rd our G-d, King of the Universe, who has granted us life, sustained us and enabled us to reach this occasion.

Blessings over the performance of mitzvot (e.g. lighting candles) always take place before the action of the mitzvah. There is one exception: when one who is converting immerses in the mikveh, he needs to recite the blessings <B>after</B> the immersion, not before. As he is not a Jew until he immerses, he cannot recite a blessing meant to be said by a Jew until he actually is one.  The convert becomes a Jew only after the immersion is completed.  So he immerses himself once in the water.  Then, he says the blessings.  After the blessings, he immerses twice more and then leaves the mikveh.  He is a Jew!

CONVERSION OF ADULTS

 

Converting to Judaism is a serious, extremely personal decision that requires a great deal of soul searching, a tremendous commitment to learn about Judaism, and a true desire to live a Jewish life. One should never convert to make someone else happy. Conversion should be done to enrich your own spiritual life. To become a Jew, one cannot simply decide that s/he is Jewish.   S/he must engage in a rigorous study of Judaism while living our rituals, traditions, and customs.


Rabbi Andrew is honored to have worked with many wonderful "Jews-by choice" - some of whom are now leaders at Ramat Shalom. He is happy to speak with anyone who is considering converting to Judaism. However, he is only committed to working with those with a strong, personal and spiritual conviction to pursuing conversion. If you are interested in conversion, please call the office to set up an preliminary appointment with the Rabbi. Those who the Rabbi chooses to work with will be expected to meet with the Rabbi on a regular basis. The Rabbi will develop an individualized course of study for each conversion student that will involve reading, synagogue attendance, and involvement in Jewish life. At the conclusion of their conversion program, each convert will be expected to write a statement explaining why they have chosen to become a Jew. In addition, on the first Kabbalat Shabbat service after one converts to Judaism, the Ramat Shalom will formally welcome the newest member of the Jewish people by asking her/him to carry the Torah around our sanctuary as each member of the congregation welcomes her/him.

 

A male who wishes to convert must undergo Brit Milah or Hatifat Dam. These procedures are performed by a mohel, a Jew who has received extensive training in ritual circumcision. Rabbi Andrew will put you in touch with a mohel you can trust.

 

At the conclusion of a convert's studies, s/he sits before a Beit Din (a court or panel) made up of three Jews (who are not related to the convert), explains why s/he has chosen to convert to Judaism and answers any questions the Beit Din might have. Upon approval of the Beit Din, the convert than must immerse in a mikveh, a ritual pool, while reciting specific blessings. Upon completing the ritual of mikveh, the convert is welcomed into the Jewish people as a "Jew-by-choice" and is to be treated no differently than one who is born into Judaism.

 

CONVERSION OF CHILDREN

 

Oftentimes, parents choose to convert their child to Judaism. Perhaps they adopted a child. Or maybe one or both of the parents choose to convert to Judaism and convert their child along with them. It is also very common for inter-faith couples, where dad is Jewish, but mom is not, to to convert their children. While many in the Reconstructionist and Reform Movements consider a child born to a Jewish father and non-Jewish mother to be Jewish, the Conservative and Orthodox Movements believe that a child born to a non-Jewish mother is not Jewish - even if the father is. While a child born to a non-Jewish mother is considered Jewish within the walls of Ramat Shalom, this child might very well find her identity being questioned by the larger Jewish community as she get older. Because of this, our Rabbi strongly encourages inter-faith families where dad is Jewish, but mom is not, to consider converting their children.

 

In order for a child to convert to Judaism, the parents must agree, before a beit din, to raise her as a Jew. Immersion in a mikveh is required for children. At least one parent is expected to go in the mikveh with the child. For infant boys, either Brit Milah or Hatifat Dam is required. For boys who are no longer infants, Rabbi Andrew will discuss Brit Milah/Hatifat Dam options.  

 

A child (especially a young child or infant) is not required to do any type of studying in preparation for a conversion. Ultimately, of course, the child will study and, in essence, make the decision to accept the decision her parents made to convert her/him. At the child's bat mitzvah/bar mitzvah, when s/he stands before the Torah and chants from it, s/he will actually affirm her/his conversion to Judaism.

 

Rabbi Andrew is honored to have worked with many wonderful "Jews-by choice" - some of whom are now leaders at Ramat Shalom. He is happy to speak with anyone who is considering converting to Judaism. However, he is only committed to working with those with a strong, personal and spiritual conviction to pursuing conversion. If you are interested in conversion, please call the office to set up an preliminary appointment with the Rabbi. Those who the Rabbi chooses to work with will be expected to meet with the Rabbi on a regular basis. The Rabbi will develop an individualized course of study for each conversion student that will involve reading, synagogue attendance, and involvement in Jewish life. At the conclusion of their conversion program, each convert will be expected to write a statement explaining why they have chosen to become a Jew. In addition, on the first Kabbalat Shabbat service after one converts to Judaism, the Ramat Shalom will formally welcome the newest member of the Jewish people by asking her/him to carry the Torah around our sanctuary as each member of the congregation welcomes her/him.

 

For more information on conversion click here.

 

For help with choosing a Hebrew name click here.

 

Below, you will find the blessings recited by a convert who immerses in a makveh after a lengthy period of study, (Brit Milah/Hatifat Dam for male), and approval of a Beit Din:

 

Baruch Atah Ado-nai Elo-henu Melech Ha'olam Asher Kidshanu B'mitzvotav V'tzivanu Al Ha'tevillah

 

Blessed are You, O Lord, our God, King of the universe, who has sanctified us with His commandments and commanded us regarding the immersion

 

Baruch Atah Ado-nai Elo-henu Melech Ha'olam , Shehecheyanu, v'ki'manu, v'higiyanu, lazman hazeh

 

Blessed are You, L-rd our G-d, King of the Universe, who has granted us life, sustained us and enabled us to reach this occasion.

 

Blessings over the performance of mitzvot (e.g. lighting candles) always take place before the action of the mitzvah. There is one exception: when one who is converting immerses in the mikveh, he needs to recite the blessings after the immersion, not before. As he is not a Jew until he immerses, he cannot recite a blessing meant to be said by a Jew until he actually is one. The convert becomes a Jew only after the immersion is completed. So he immerses himself once in the water. Then, he says the blessings. After the blessings, he immerses twice more and then leaves the mikveh. He is a Jew!

Ramat Shalom Synagogue
11301 West Broward Boulevard
Plantation, Florida 33325
954-472-3600
954-472-3622 fax
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